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PostPosted: 23/02/2006 09:46:23
dernieres infos de l 'excelent site de Graham
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http://www.grahamhancock.com/news/index.php



February 21 2006
Court Allows Church's Hallucinogenic Tea
Court Allows Church's Hallucinogenic Tea


WASHINGTON - A small branch of a South American religious sect may use hallucinogenic tea as part of a ritual intended to connect with God, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.

In its first religious freedom decision under Chief Justice John Roberts, the court said the government cannot hinder religious practices without proof of a "compelling" need to do so.

"This is a very important decision for minority religious freedom in this country," said lawyer John Boyd, who represents about 130 U.S. members of O Centro Espirita Beneficiente Uniao do Vegetal who live in New Mexico, California and Colorado.

The tea, which contains an illegal drug known as DMT, is considered sacred to members of the sect, which has a blend of Christian beliefs and South American traditions. Members believe they can understand God only by drinking the tea, which is consumed twice a month at four-hour ceremonies.

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February 17 2006 (updated February 20 2006)
Beyond crusades: how (not) to engage with alternative archaeologies
New forum article: 'Beyond crusades: how (not) to engage with alternative archaeologies' by Cornelius Holtorf




At grahamhancock.com we are used to being at the receiving end of vile and intemperate attacks by archaeologists accusing us of being "pseudo-archaeologists", pseudo-scientists, etc., and of advocating "fringe", "cult" or "fantastic" ideas about history and prehistory. It is refreshing to discover, however, that not all archaeologists share this knee-jerk hostility towards alternative ideas about the past.

Assistant Professor Cornelius Holtorf, criticises some influential figures within mainstream archaeology for attempting to form "a special state police force dedicated to eradicating interpretations that are considered false or inappropriate by a self-selected jury." Holtorf goes on to argue that "modern society might benefit more from inquiring minds than from passive students to whom factual knowledge is taught, however much that knowledge consists of 'pure truth'."

Join in discussion here
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February 20 2006
Next shuttle crew training for the unexpected
Next shuttle crew training for the unexpected; Commander Lindsey confident of foam fix




CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (AP) -- The commander of the next space shuttle said Friday that NASA has taken the right steps to reduce the amount of potentially lethal foam that falls off during launch.

"We will lose foam on this flight, just like every other," said commander Steven Lindsey, who could lead a crew into space as early as May. "The key is to make sure that the foam we do lose is a small enough size so it can't hurt us if it hits the vehicle."

NASA had redesigned the external fuel tank after a large piece of insulating foam hit the wing of the shuttle Columbia in 2003, sparking the disaster that killed seven astronauts.
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February 20 2006
Study: T. Rex Had Acute Senses
Study: T. Rex Had Acute Senses




The huge, ferocious North American Tyrannosaurus rex was a rigid and stiff beast with razor-sharp sensory skills, according to new research presented Friday at the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in St. Louis.

CT scans allowed Lawrence Witmer, from Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine, to explore the inside of a four-foot-long T. rex skull and look for regions that were unusually developed.

Several 3-D visualizations of the brain cavity, nerve and vascular trunks, and the labyrinth of the inner ear, revealed that the beast had surprisingly well-developed smell, hearing and balance, normally features typical of smaller and more agile animals.
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February 20 2006
Gur bas-reliefs of Sassanid royal family completely unearthed
Gur bas-reliefs of Sassanid royal family completely unearthed




TEHRAN -- The team of archaeologists working at the Sassanid city of Gur has completely unearthed the bas-reliefs of four members of the Sassanid royal family which they had discovered in the Menarshahr region of the ancient site in early January, the Persian service of CHN reported on Saturday.

Carved on one of the walls of a newly discovered palace at the site, these colorful unique bas-reliefs depict two princesses along with a prince and child with a calf. The team had previously unearthed only the heads of the bas-reliefs and knew nothing about their clothing or other accessories.

“The royal family members are all young, and this is the first time such bas-reliefs have been discovered from the era when Ardashir I (224-241 CE) reigned,” the head of the archaeological team, Leili Niakan, said.

All of the bas-reliefs are intact except one of the princesses, whose head has been destroyed by the ravages of time.
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February 19 2006
Villa of Roman emperor raises new questions for researchers
Villa of Roman emperor raises new questions for researchers on dig in Italy




In The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Edward Gibbon portrays the pagan emperor Maxentius as a licentious youth and "a tyrant as contemptible as he was odious."

Historians have long assumed that the reviled Roman emperor lived part-time at an 80-acre suburban villa complex until he was killed by his rival Constantine at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge in A.D. 312.

But a University of Colorado-led archaeology team has uncovered evidence that the villa's main hall was never occupied.

Instead, it appears to have been abandoned before completion, said CU archaeologist Diane Conlin, co-director of the Maxentius project, a five-year excavation that began last summer.
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February 19 2006
Snakemen Stone Reliefs Discovered in Jiroft
Snakemen Stone Reliefs Discovered in Jiroft


LONDON, (CAIS) -- Recent archeological excavations in Kenar-Sandal area in Jiroft resulted in the discovery of two stone reliefs. The reliefs depict two men with human faces but snake bodies; English service of CHN reported Thursday February 02.

“These reliefs were carved on soapstones. They are 25 by 17 centimeter in size with a thickness of about 1.5 centimeters,” said Professor Yousof Majidzadeh, head of excavation team in Jifort.

“This is the first time that such stone reliefs of creatures that are half human and half snake have been discovered in this historical site. However, carvings of scorpion-like human beings on stones and eagle reliefs had previously been discovered in this historical site. These stone reliefs were carved on a flat stone, and there are 12 circles on the arms of each of them. Most probably, this flat piece of stone had an entertainment usage some 5000 years ago, something like today’s backgammon. These circles are carved around the arms and the chests of the carved figures. Similar instruments have been seen in Burnt City as well, and archeologists believe that these must have been objects built for playing games,” added Majidzadeh.

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February 19 2006
Carmarthenshire Cairn reveals links with bronze age Scotland
Carmarthenshire Cairn reveals links with bronze age Scotland




New research on an excavated Bronze Age burial mound in south Wales has revealed links to funeral sites as far away as the Orkney Islands.

The burial mound on the Black Mountain in Carmarthenshire was unearthed by Cambria Archaeology in 2004 after it was feared that the weather and visitors to the area were causing permanent damage to the site.

Archaeologists discovered a large rectangular stone cist at the centre of the mound containing the cremated bones of a young child, a pottery urn, a bone pin and several flint tools.

The cist also contained the cremated bones of two pigs and what is though to be a dog. Research revealed that second later burial took place at the site, which was added to the side of the mound.
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February 19 2006
Two Ancient Caves Discovered in Qasr-e Shirin
Two Ancient Caves Discovered in Qasr-e Shirin

Archeological excavations in the city of Qasr-e Shirin led to the discovery of two caves belonging to the Neolithic and Middle Elamite periods.

Tehran, 16 February 2006 (CHN) -- Archeological excavations in the city of Qasr-e Shirin resulted in the discovery of two caves belonging to the Neolithic epoch and the Middle Elamite period.

“Two caves were discovered in the southern foothills of Bazidar Mountains, one of them dates back to some 9000 years ago that is Neolithic epoch, and the other belongs to the Middle Elamite period and contemporary to the Iron Age in Zagross and Central Plateau of Iran. A large number of stone tools have also been discovered in a small cave during the excavations. The depth and the opening of this cave are both 6 meters and it seems that it was used as a shelter by the inhabitants of the region. During Iran-Iraq war this cave was used by Iraqi soldiers as bulwark and now the local nomads use this cave to keep their cattle in it,” said Ali Hajbari, head of excavation team in Qasr-e Shirin.
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February 19 2006
Waterworld: how life on Earth will look 1,000 years from now
Waterworld: how life on Earth will look 1,000 years from now




By the next millennium the global map will have been redrawn by disastrous climate changes, according to a new forecast

AN APOCALYPTIC vision of life 1,000 years from now has been painted by a team of scientists studying the effect of global warming.

If mankind does not put its house in order, temperatures could have risen by 15C (27F) by the year 3000 and sea levels by more than 11 metres (36ft), flooding much of London, the team, from the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, says in a report for the Environment Agency. Abrupt changes could make Britain much hotter, or even — such is the uncertainty of the predictions — first colder and then hotter.

This could happen if the North Atlantic current system collapsed, denying Britain the warming effect of the Gulf Stream. Ocean surface temperatures would fall by 3C (5.4F), but as the Arctic sea ice melted, they would rise again by 8C (14.4F) in an abrupt turnabout over a period of no more than about 20 years.
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February 18 2006
Greek Hiker Finds 6,500-Year-Old Pendant
Greek Hiker Finds 6,500-Year-Old Pendant


THESSALONIKI, Greece Feb 16, 2006 (AP)— A Greek hiker found a 6,500-year-old gold pendant in a field and handed it over to authorities, an archaeologist said Thursday.

The flat, roughly ring-shaped prehistoric pendant probably had religious significance and would have been worn on a necklace by a prominent member of society.

Only three such gold artifacts have been discovered during organized digs, archaeologist Georgia Karamitrou-Mendesidi, head of the Greek archaeological service in the northern region where the discovery was made, told The Associated Press.

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February 16 2006
Henges years older than pyramids
Henges years older than pyramids




An ancient North Yorkshire monument has been recognised as being almost 1,000 years older than the pyramids of Giza.

Researchers at Newcastle University have found the Thornborough Henges are one of the earliest major monuments aligned to the constellation Orion.

The 5,500-year-old earthworks, north of Ripon, and the Egyptian pyramids are thought to have been built to mirror Orion's belt for its religious focus.

The research will be published in 2007 in a new report on the henges complex.
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February 15 2006
Mars Rover Reaches 'Home Plate'
Mars Rover Reaches 'Home Plate'




The Mars rover Spirit has hit a home run by landing in a rugged plateau dubbed "Home Plate," but scientists are still trying to decipher its geology.

The six-wheeled Spirit reached the northern edge of the broad mesa last week about four months after climbing down from a Martian hill as tall as the Statue of Liberty. Scientists believe "Home Plate," which stands about 6 feet high, holds important geologic clues to the Red Planet's past.

So far, scientists say they are puzzled by what they have seen. Unlike other areas of Gusev Crater that Spirit has analyzed, "Home Plate" is made of a highly layered rocks that are coarse at the bottom and fine at the top.

"It's stunning ... by far the best layering we've ever seen at Gusev," principal investigator Steve Squyres of Cornell University recently posted on his Web site.
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February 15 2006
Darwin's warm pond theory tested
Darwin's warm pond theory tested


Life on Earth was unlikely to have emerged from volcanic springs or hydrothermal vents, according to a leading US researcher. Experiments carried out in volcanic pools suggest they do not provide the right conditions to spawn life.

The findings are being discussed at an international two-day meeting to explore the latest thinking on the origin of life on Earth. It is taking place at the Royal Society in London.

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February 15 2006
Stone Age artists are getting older
Stone Age artists are getting older




RECENT discoveries in Italy and Germany have pushed back the age of Stone Age art in Europe by several millennia. Cave painting from near Verona and carved animal figures from the Danube valley suggest that our ancestors were creating art across a broad area well before 30,000 years ago.

At the Fumane cave, on the southern edge of the Alps, an occupation with tools of Aurignacian type, made by the first modern humans in Europe, has been radiocarbon dated to between 34,000 and 32,000 years ago. In the Aurignacian deposits painted rock fragments were found which had spalled off the walls of the cave because of the freezing of water in cracks: erosion of the paint showed that the art, in red and yellow ochre lines, had been on the walls for some time before it fell and was buried.

Among the motifs is an “anthropomorph”, a humanoid figure, according to Dr Alberto Broglio. It is full face, with two horns which “may be a mask” on its head; the arms are by its side and the legs are spread. “The right hand is holding something which is hanging downwards, probably a ritual object,” Dr Broglio says. Another figure shows a four-legged animal seen from the side and “resembles the profile of a small statuette from Vogelherd”. Radiocarbon dates from the Vogelherd caves, near Ulm on the upper Danube, also give dates between 36,000 and 30,000 years ago, Dr Nicholas Conard points out in a new book discussing the importance of the Fumane paintings. He agrees that “the red paintings from Fumane are of extreme importance” for a number of reasons, among them the contrast between the rather simple form of the Fumane figures and the more sophisticated detail of the Vogelherd carvings, which include a famous horse carved from mammoth ivory and less than two inches long, found in 1931.
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February 14 2006
Ancient sea link discovered by ASI
Ancient sea link discovered by ASI




CHANDIGARH, Feb. 12. — Unraveling some facts buried in history, experts from Archaeological Survey of India said the possibility of a sea link between south India and the rest of Asia about 3,800 years ago could not be ruled out.

Mr Arun Malik, an archaeologist with ASI, Chennai, while throwing light on Adichannallur civilisation, said here that the observation of human morphological types based on the cranial evidences point to the existence of more than one racial and ethnic group in that region during the period of the civilisation’s long geo-historic period. “Occurrences of intermediate and pure traits of yellow race of South–east and Far-east Asia and typical ethnic and tribal Indians on the external morphology of the skulls and bones give credence to the fact that a sea trade may have been there,” said Mr P Raghavan, a bio-anthropologist currently assisting ASI, Chennai, in studying geo-morphological aspects.

Mr Malik said the latest excavations at the Adichanallur’s pre-historic site along the coast of Tuticorin in Tamil Nadu have yielded more than 160 urns, many of which contained hundreds of different-sized potteries. Husk, paddy and other cereals have also been found in the urns.

He said the people of Adichanallur were agrarian in nature who also mastered blacksmithery and made a variety of iron implements.
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February 14 2006
West Columbia dig uncovers mysteries
West Columbia dig uncovers mysteries; tales of graves of Mexican War soldiers have yet to be confirmed


WEST COLUMBIA - An archaeological dig in one of Texas' oldest cemeteries Saturday failed to find the mass graves of 248 Mexican War soldiers that local lore has long said were buried there.

The dig did, however, uncover some other historical mysteries. "I knew we would find some answers," said Texas A&M archaeologist Alston Thoms, "and I was fairly sure they wouldn't be the answers we were looking for."

Generations of local residents have grown up hearing stories of 248 Mexican War soldiers who died in an epidemic being buried in a mass grave of the old Columbia Cemetery, said Sands Weems III, a director of the association that operates the cemetery. Sixteen Civil War soldiers also were said to have been buried there, Weems said.

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February 14 2006
'Monumental' tomb find in Greece
'Monumental' tomb find in Greece




THESSALONIKI, Greece (AP) -- Archaeologists have unearthed a massive tomb in the northern Greek town of Pella, capital of the ancient kingdom of Macedonia and birthplace of Alexander the Great.

The eight-chambered tomb dates to the Hellenistic Age between the fourth and second century B.C., and is the largest of its kind ever found in Greece. The biggest multichambered tombs until now contained three chambers.

The 678-square-foot (63-square-meter) tomb hewn out of rock was discovered by a farmer plowing his field on the eastern edge of the ancient cemetery of Pella, some 370 miles (595 kilometers) north of Athens, archaeologists said.

"This is the largest and most monumental tomb of its kind ever found in Greece," said Maria Akamati, who led the excavations.
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February 9 2006
Sharks' Sixth Sense Related to Human Genes
Sharks' Sixth Sense Related to Human Genes




The same genes that give sharks their sixth sense and allow them to detect electrical signals are also responsible for the development of head and facial features in humans, a new study suggests.

The finding supports the idea that the early sea creatures which eventually evolved into humans could also sense electricity before they emerged onto land.

The study, led by Martin Cohn and his lab at the University of Florida, is detailed in the current issue of the journal Evolution & Development.
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February 9 2006
Scientists Sequence Complete Genome of Woolly Mammoth
Scientists Sequence Complete Genome of Woolly Mammoth; sequence is oldest mitochondrial genome to date

Some 10,000 years after the last of their kind wandered the North American and Eurasian wilderness, woolly mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius) remain a fascinating subject of study for scientists, with implications for understanding the evolutionary origins of present day mammals. Mammoths and elephants belong to one of the most ancient mammalian groups and various recent studies have debated the genetic relationships between them. Now, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences have weighed in on the issue, with results supported by the oldest mitochondrial genome sequence determined to date from the remains of a mammoth that died approximately 33,000 years ago.

In "Complete mitochondrial genome and phylogeny of Pleistocene mammoth Mammuthus primigenius," published in the February 7 issue of PLoS Biology, a publication of the Public Library of Science (PLoS), Evgeny I. Rogaev, PhD, a professor of psychiatry at UMass Medical School and professor of genetics at the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, with colleagues from the Brudnick Neuropsychiatric Research Insitute at UMass Medical School, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow State University and the University of California-San Diego, report the sequence of the complete mitochondrial genome (16,842 base pairs) of a woolly mammoth extracted from permafrost-preserved remains from the Pleistocene epoch, a period of time usually dated from between 1.6-1.9 million to about 10,000 years before present. Their study demonstrates that the woolly mammoth and the Asian elephant are a sister species that diverged soon after their common ancestor split from the lineage of the African elephant.
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PostPosted: 23/02/2006 09:46:23
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